CAPITAL COERCION AND CRIME BOSSISM IN THE PHILIPPINES PDF

For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism. Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations. Portrayals of a "weak state" captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines. The author, by contrast, argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development.

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ISBN Full text not available from this repository. For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism. Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations. The author, by contrast, argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development.

These contradictions have encouraged bossism in the Philippines, as well as in other countries. The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu.

The contrast between single-generation gangster politicians in Cavite and enduring commercial dynasties in Cebu reveals variation in the forms of bossism that reflect variations in the local political economies of the two provinces. Comparisons between bosses over successive historical periods highlight the gradual transformation of bossism through capitalist development.

In sum, Capital, Coercion, and Crime provides a comparative historical analysis of bossism, drawing conclusions of great interest not only to scholars of Southeast Asia but to students of comparative politics as well. Item Type:.

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Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines

PDF k Signaler ce document 1The Philippines, as a Third-World, post-colonial nation, has its share of fairly serious political, economic, and social problems. Indeed, the idea that voters support bosses mainly because of their charisma and noblesse oblige is ridiculous when we face the stark reality of boss violence. This leads him, unfortunately, to dismiss altogether the explanatory relevance of culture—an issue I address further below. In other words, the system is not broken—ather, it is a runaway success. Such a radical notion will prove jarring to many, but it certainly explains why some politicians in the Philippines cannot seem to help enriching themselves while in office. This essentially means that elected officials acquired broad discretionary powers over all local resources law enforcement, taxes, local appointments, etc.

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CAPITAL COERCION AND CRIME BOSSISM IN THE PHILIPPINES PDF

For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism. Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations. Portrayals of a "weak state" captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of American colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines. The author, by contrast, argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration of formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development. These contradictions have encouraged bossism in the Philippines, as well as in other countries. The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu. The contrast between single-generation gangster politicians in Cavite and enduring commercial dynasties in Cebu reveals variation in the forms of bossism that reflect variations in the local political economies of the two provinces.

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Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines

By Oona Thommes Paredes The Philippines, as a Third-World, post-colonial nation, has its share of fairly serious political, economic, and social problems. Indeed, the idea that voters support bosses mainly because of their charisma and noblesse oblige is ridiculous when we face the stark reality of boss violence. This leads him, unfortunately, to dismiss altogether the explanatory relevance of culture -- an issue I address further below. Sidel also presents a critique of the theory that widespread bossism is evidence of a weak state.

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PDF k Send by e-mail 1The Philippines, as a Third-World, post-colonial nation, has its share of fairly serious political, economic, and social problems. Indeed, the idea that voters support bosses mainly because of their charisma and noblesse oblige is ridiculous when we face the stark reality of boss violence. This leads him, unfortunately, to dismiss altogether the explanatory relevance of culture—an issue I address further below. In other words, the system is not broken—ather, it is a runaway success.

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